Personal Injury and Auto Accidents

Injury law has a bad reputation.  I used to think that those who sued someone for an accident were taking advantage of an unfortunate situation.  However, my opinion changed when I had to deal with an insurance company after my own accident!    I was travelling through a neighboring state and was hit by a tire that came off the trailer of a semi-truck, hub and all.  He should have been charged with criminally negligent homicide!

The accident was serious, almost totaling the car I was in.  I was lucky and came away only with a knee injury.

Believe it or not, the insurance company for the trucker denied my claim!  I was shocked!   Since then, I have heard the same story from many others in similar situation.   That accident was one of the reasons I became an attorney. 

Let’s discuss some of the basics of injury law.  First, the definition of a personal injury.  In most instances we are talking about an incident which occurs as the result of the actions of a negligent party, which results is the proximate cause of an injury to another party.  Personal injury comes in many forms, including accidents caused by negligent conditions (slippery floors in supermarkets), accidents caused by negligent actions (business communicating untrue and damaging statements about a competitor to customers ) and the most common accidents of all, auto accidents.

There are special areas of injury law which require special elements of proof.  However, in most cases you may recover damages for an injury if you are able to show four elements:
– The other person was negligent
– His or her negligence was the proximate cause of your injuries
– You were not contributory negligent
– You hold a valid immigration status, such as green card or citizenship.

Global Expansion and the Need for an Effective Distribution Channel Strategy


Successful companies have a fundamental understanding of what their customers want and how to provide solutions they will buy. They also understand where and how their customers want to buy. This success is ultimately dependent on the efficiency and scope of the company’s go-to-market strategies. Therefore, optimizing their distribution channel strategy is a crucial factor to companies achieving sustainable growth and competitiveness in both their domestic and foreign markets.

The rise of emergent market middle class and the resurgence of developing economies in the past two decades have accelerated globalization at an exponential rate. Tantalizing new opportunities in regions such as South East Asia and the Gulf Cooperation Council are complicated to achieve but impossible to ignore. Most companies are aware that global expansion carries risks but few truly appreciate the need for a comprehensive market entry strategy and the supplemental research. This is understandable; domestic success often breeds complacency and even undue confidence, the idea that “if it works here, it will work there” is not an uncommon one in the contemporary SME. Not uncommon but dangerous, understandable but avoidable. Many companies experience significant setbacks in growth and even bankruptcy following inefficient market entry.

Weaknesses and inefficiencies within a company’s distribution network can have detrimental consequences to both short-term financial results and long-term competitiveness. Additionally, poorly managed distributor relationships are an entirely preventable drain on supplier’s resources. These effects are significant within a domestic market but in a foreign market they can be disastrous. Potential consequences arising from ineffective market entry are poor-fit partners (often with exclusivity contracts); misaligned distributor objectives and cultural conflicts that disrupt channel partner relationships before they have a chance to succeed. This inevitably results in a failure to reach end-users allowing competitors the opportunity to establish significant market presence in your absence.

To achieve successful market expansion companies must engage in comprehensive market research to ascertain, not only the economic status and cultural preferences of the target market, but also to investigate the key players in their sector and the best-fit partners to sell their product and, ultimately grow their business. The factors to consider are numerous and diverse. Market maturity can guarantee stability and sustainability but may yield low margins through competitive pricing in a saturated market. Alternatively, emerging markets may yield greater margins at greater risk. Effective research applied to a methodical channel development strategy will reveal the intricate details of a target market, allowing suppliers to make truly informed decisions. When eventually a supplier is faced with choosing a distributor, they would do well to consider potential future market entry strategies. Larger distribution companies often have presence in multiple markets so a single long-term contract could yield multiple market entries facilitated by an ally that knows those markets well.

Market expansion is not just that, it is also a diversification of a company’s market portfolio. To maximize opportunity and dilute risk, companies should avoid over concentration in one region or sector and the eternal temptation of putting too many eggs in one basket!

International expansion of a company can be challenging but a comprehensive and methodical strategy that is founded in considering the
distribution channel needs of each market separately will yield success. For any company considering or currently initiating expansion and diversification, start now! Develop and apply a global distribution channel strategy to support more effective business strategies, increase profitability and drive sustainable growth.